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Digital Media Driving Gamification of Dating World for young people, says Mindshare

Young people influenced by Facebook relationship status updates and video games where players drive fast cars and pick up girls, now treat dating as a game rather than a route to settle down in long term monogamous relationships, according to research from leading global media agency, Mindshare.

In Europe, more than ten percent of female respondents are likely to play games when dating, with 14.1% of women in France, 13.3% in Italy and 19.1% in Russia admitting to approaching love as a game.

Victoria Cook, Mindshare Planning Partner, said:  Valentine’s Day is big business these days but it’s interesting to see how many people don’t take love seriously. We’re living in a fast-paced world and social media can have a major impact on the way young people interact with their peers."

It’s fascinating to see that older generations are also likely to become flippant about commitment as well. It’s this sort of insight that underlines why companies large and small work with Mindshare to provide the strategic advice about consumers that allows them to shape their strategy. The world continues to change and understanding it is essential if businesses are to thrive.

The research from Mindreader, Mindshare’s proprietary research tool, also indicates that while the younger generations are more likely to be flippant about dating, it seems that familiarity does not necessarily make the heart grow stronger with growing numbers of men and women aged 55-65 admitting that they treat love like a game.

The Baby Boomer generation may therefore be more likely to be looking heading for divorce, or perhaps trying to have fun after breaking up from long-term partners.

In this older age bracket, 21.4% of women in Denmark are game-players in love, compared to 28.6% in Thailand, 11.6% in France and 13.6% in Belgium.

The research from Mindreader, Mindshare’s proprietary research tool, also indicates that while the younger generations are more likely to be flippant about dating, it seems that familiarity does not necessarily make the heart grow stronger with growing numbers of men and women aged 55-65 admitting that they treat love like a game.

The Baby Boomer generation may therefore be more likely to be looking heading for divorce, or perhaps trying to have fun after breaking up from long-term partners.

In this older age bracket, 21.4% of women in Denmark are game-players in love, compared to 28.6% in Thailand, 11.6% in France and 13.6% in Belgium.